Hong Kong: Trans marriages allowed to go ahead despite legislative stalling

The Legislative Council has delayed the bill until after its summer recess. Get the latest LGBT headlines in your inbox with our free daily newsletter! Join Topics trans rightsgender reassignment surgeryHong Konggender confirmation surgerytrans marriagecourt of final appeallegcolegislative delays Share on WhatsApp 0 reader comments

Transgender people in Hong Kong who have undergone full gender-reassignment surgeries will be able to marry from today, despite legislative stalling.

Last year, a trans woman known as

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US: Utah asks for US Supreme Court to block ruling to recognise same-sex marriages

The letter was sent by Governor Gary Herbert Share on WhatsApp 0 reader comments

The US state of Utah has asked the US Supreme Court in an emergency appeal to block a ruling instructing the state to recognise the marraiges of hundreds of same-sex couples in the state.

Over 1000 gay couples married in the state, where same-sex marriage was legalised for 17 days after a judge ruled in December that the state’s marriage ban is unconstitutional.

However, on January 6, the US Supreme Court stayed the ruling, putting the marriage ban back in place and causing some to doubt the legality of the marriages.

The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last week that the state must begin to recognise those marriages, despite the ongoing battle over marriage equality.

On Wednesday state officials filed the emergency appeal, asking the US Supreme Court to block the ruling by the appeals court, saying recognising those marriages would be too disruptive.

The appeal was addressed to Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, and was sent by Governor Gary Herbert and Attorney General Sean Reyes.

It said ordering the state to recognise the marriages was “premature and unwarranted.”

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Utah Asks SCOTUS For Stay In Case Recognizing Same-Sex Marriages

The office of Utah’s attorney general has filed an emergency petition to the U.S. Supreme Court seeking a stay on a ruling that the state must legally recognize same-sex marriages performed while gay marriage was briefly legal in the state.

If granted the stay, the state would have more time to prepare its appeal to the high court. The existing stay on the ruling expires on July 21.

Last week, the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals denied Utah’s attempt to block recognition of 1,300 same-sex marriages that were performed while the state’s ban was lifted last December.

Reuters reports:

Utah refused to confer legal recognition of gay and lesbian marriages performed in the interim, leaving those couples unable to proceed with adoptions, obtain spousal health insurance benefits or legally change their names.

Four newlywed same-sex couples then filed a separate lawsuit to get the state to recognize their marital status, winning a decision in May from another federal judge that their marriages were valid. But that judge also temporarily stayed his own ruling to let Utah petition for a lengthier injunction pending appeal.

The 10th Circuit on Friday denied that request for a permanent injunction.

In the petition for the emergency hold, state officials claimed that “there is a likelihood

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US: Colorado Attorney General asks state Supreme Court to halt same-sex marriages

Colorado Attorney General John Suthers is asking the state Supreme Court to halt same-sex marriages Share on WhatsApp 3 reader comments

Colorado Attorney General John Suthers has asked the Colorado Supreme Court to stop same-sex marriages in the state until they rule on his appeal of a lower court’s ruling that found Colorado’s ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional.

District Judge C. Scott Crabtree overturned Colorado’s same-sex marriage ban last week, but immediately put his own ruling on hold until it is backed-up by a court with greater authority. 

A judge also ruled last week in a lawsuit Suthers brought against Hillary Hall, a rouge Boulder county clerk who has been issuing same-sex marriage licenses, that Hall had the right to issue the licenses for the time being.

In response to these rulings, Suthers is asking the state Supreme Court to halt the issuance of same-sex marriage licenses until they review Crabtree’s ruling, which would help decide whether to lift Crabtree’s self-imposed hold on his own decision.

After asking the state Supreme Court to rule, Suther’s said:

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US: ACLU asks federal government to recognise Indiana same-sex marriages

The ACLU has asked Eric Holder to issue a statement for Indiana same-sex couples married in June Share on WhatsApp 0 reader comments

The American Civil Liberties Union has asked US Attorney General Eric Holder to issue a statement saying the federal government will recognise Indiana same-sex marriages done before a federal appeals court stayed the striking down of the state’s same-sex marriage ban.

A statement by Holder would make same-sex couples married in the state before the stay was put in place eligible for federal benefits granted to other married couples.

Holder has issued similar statements for both Utah and Michigan in the presence of similar stays to their marriage bans.

In a letter mailed to the attorney general’s office Friday, legal director of the ACLU of Indiana Ken Falk said:

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US: More Colorado counties follow lead of clerk given green light for same-sex marriages

At least two new counties said they would begin issuing licences to same-sex couples Get the latest LGBT headlines in your inbox with our free daily newsletter! Join Share on WhatsApp 0 reader comments

At least two more counties in the US state of Colorado have announced that they will soon begin marrying same-sex couples, after a judge ruled in favour of a clerk who had defied instructions to allow gay couples to marry.

Colorado’s Boulder county clerk Hillary Hall can continue issuing same-sex marriage licenses in the state, a judge ruled on Thursday.

Boulder County judge Andrew Hartman ruled that Hall can continue issuing licenses, stating that although same-sex marriage is illegal in Colorado, Hall is not harming anyone with her actions.

The motion against Hall was filed by Republican Attorney General John Suthers, who claimed her 

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US: Colorado Attorney General sues clerk for performing same-sex marriages

Republican John Suthers has launched legal action againt the clerk Share on WhatsApp 3 reader comments

Colorado’s Attorney General has launched legal action against a clerk who is performing same-sex marriages in defiance of the state’s legal ban.

Hillary Hall, a rogue county clerk in Boulder County, Colorado, has married over 34 same-sex couples

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US: ACLU to file lawsuit to protect marriages of 500 Wisconsin gay, married couples

JB Van Hollen aims to nullify the marriages of more than 500 gay and lesbian couples in Wisconsin Share on WhatsApp 0 reader comments

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in the US state of Wisconsin is preparing to file a lawsuit which will aim to protect, and have recognised, the more than 500 marriages of same-sex couples.

US District Judge Barbara Crabb struck down the state’s same-sex marriage ban on Friday 6 June, leading to some counties issuing marriage licences immediately, and allowing more than 500 gay and lesbian couples to wed.

However, after Attorney General JB Van Hollen appealed, on Friday 13 June Crabb agreed to halt her ruling, stopping all new marriages until the appeal concludes.

Now the ACLU plans to file a lawsuit, should Van Hollen file a new appeal against the ruling, and if he aims to nullify the marriages of those 500

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US: Washington state to convert most domestic partnerships to marriages on Monday

Most remaining domestic partnerships will be converted to marriages 0 reader comments

Washington state will convert thousands of existing same-sex domestic partnerships into marriages on Monday.

The state – which introduced domestic partnerships in 2007, and same-sex marriage in 2012 – has decided to discontinue domestic partnerships entirely, following a substantial drop in use.

On Monday, all existing partnerships in which at least one partner is currently under the age of 62 will be converted to marriages, and new partnerships will also be closed to those under the age of 62. Domestic partnerships will remain available to seniors.

There are currently more than 6,500 domestic partnerships, most of which will be converted.

Monisha Harrell, the chair of Equal Rights Washington whose own partnership is due to be converted, told the Seattle Times: “We’ve been building our lives together and the law has finally caught on.”

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray said the partnerships were only ever intended as a half-measure, adding: “There will be no second-class recognition of gay and lesbian relationships. There will be marriage.”

Of the bureaucratic challenge of the en masse change in status, Pam Floyd, corporations director in the Secretary of State’s Office said: “We know there are scenarios we’ve not thought of. I’m sure we’ll come up against those and will handle them on a case-by-case basis. This is the first time we’ve had to confront something like this.”

The move marks the final part of the state’s equal marriage legislation, passed in 2012 with 52% of the vote.

In the UK, it was announced this week that civil partnerships will remain as an option for same-sex couples despite the introduction of same-sex marriage, but that they would not be opened up to opposite-sex couples.

The move followed a consultation into the future of civil partnerships, but no clear consensus could be reached.

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US: Indiana court halts same-sex marriages

Craig Bowen and Jake Miller were the first couple to marry in the state Get the latest LGBT headlines in your inbox with our free daily newsletter! Join 4 reader comments

An Indiana court has put the state’s marriage ban back into place temporarily, staying an earlier ruling striking it down.

On Wednesday Judge Richard Young ruled that the Indiana’s marriage ban was unconstitutional, and did not stay his ruling, allowing marriages to begin immediately.

Despite hundreds of same-sex couples marrying, the state’s Attorney General, Republican Greg Zoeller, indicated his intent to appeal the ruling, and applied for an emergency stay to be granted.

Today, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned Young’s decision not to stay the ruling, putting the ban back into place, and blocking new marriages.

The Attorney General had argued it was “premature” to require Indiana to change its definition of marriage, until the US Supreme Court has ruled on the issue.

Lambda Legal said in a statement: “For now, same-sex couples are once again denied the freedom to marry in Indiana.

“The emergency order issued by the appeals court not only puts on hold the continued issuance of marriage licenses to same-sex couples, but it also prevents continued recognition of the marriage of Niki Quasney and Amy Sandler, who were granted emergency relief early in the case because Niki is battling Stage IV ovarian cancer.

“Niki, Amy, and their two toddler-aged daughters need respect as a legal family during this agonizingly difficult time.

“It is wrong to block the marriages of all couples and it’s a shameful display of cruelty towards a Niki and Amy and their two children whose marriage is vital as they battle an aggressive cancer and fight to be together.

“Lambda Legal will do everything in our power to win marriage for all Hoosiers. Greg Zoeller will not have the last word, justice will.”

Hoosiers Unite for Marriage spokesman Kyle Megrath said: “More than anything, this is a terrible blow to the legally wedded Indiana couples and their families who were finally, after so long, recognized this week under Indiana law.”

The first same-sex couple to marry in the state were Craig Bowen and Jake Miller, who ran to the clerk’s office in Indianapolis after hearing news of the court ruling.

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